Monthly Archives

January 2016

Alumni Profiles
January 31, 2016

Alumni Profile: John LaCroix of Ten Yard Fight, While You Were Sleeping, and much more

John LaCroix is one of the many people who I never knew back in the day, but whose name always came up in conversation. He's probably best known for playing guitar in Ten Yard Fight and Unrestrained, but I've always been a big fan of his work behind the scenes as the brains behind magazines like Extent, While You Were Sleeping and Swindle. He was also one of the first hardcore kids to become a legit "creative professional" outside of the music/ skateboarding/ etc world, with a very impressive resume as a Creative Director where he's worked with clients like Samsung, NASCAR, Apple, and ESPN-- check out his portfolio for more details. He's one of the best examples of what I'm trying to document here on PRMBA: people who used the skills that they learned from DIY culture as the foundation for a successful, inspiring career as a creative professional. Very stoked to…
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Alumni Profiles
January 28, 2016

Alumni Profile: Tim Coleman of Antihero Productions & MBA candidate

If you want to lose a lot of money really fast, booking shows is a really good way to do it. Which is why I have a ton of respect for the few people who actually make some money at it. If you can put on shows for a few years without declaring bankruptcy, you can probably make it in just about any business you choose to pursue. Tim Coleman is one of those rare people, a veteran promoter with shows under his belt that include bands like Veil Of Maya, Whitechapel, Stick To Your Guns, Agnostic Front, Counterparts, and dozens more. He's also the living embodiment of the PRMBA, currently pursuing an MBA. Check out his story, and drop us a line if you know someone else we should profile! Give us your life story in a few sentences: who are you, what is/was your involvement in punk/HC/DIY culture and…
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Reader questions
January 26, 2016

PRMBA Reader questions Vol 1: apparel, careers in branding, and more

C asks: This is a question out of nowhere but you seem very business savvy and to have a lot of contacts in a wide range of fields. I'm trying to pursue my dream of starting a clothing line but I really don't know where to start. I was wondering if you had any advice or could put me in contact with someone who has some. I can read articles online about it all day but that's not the same. I read your article on how small teams work well and that kind of inspired me to actually look into this and pursue the dream. I did design and marketing for Hollister/Abercrombie & Fitch for several years and a close friend of mine was the design director for Homage, so I've seen a couple versions of the apparel business. The first thing you need to know is that THIS BUSINESS IS TOUGH.…
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Lessons
January 25, 2016

Lesson 8: How Mixtapes Taught Me Content Marketing

Before I started playing in terrible pop-punk bands, I was very much a fixture of the Seattle Hip-Hop scene. I was fortunate to have grown up in a time when skateboarding videos featured both rappers and hardcore bands (usually of the Christian music variety, but I digress), so both genres were allowed to coexist, even if only a small handful of my friends understood this appreciation. Since I was 13, I wanted to be a DJ and when I entered high school, after inheriting two very crappy Sony turntables and a Realistic brand mixer, I was making mixtapes and selling them to fellow students. Little did I know that selling homemade tapes, with songs by other people, would help me in developing key skills for content marketing and strategy. How? Understanding your audience It was 1996 and I packed my mixtapes full of popular rap songs from 2Pac and tha…
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Lessons
January 18, 2016

LESSON 7: Small teams = big ideas

Every few years, a new movement comes along that ends up being a "sea change," completely changing the face of youth culture forever. They always start small, as a few kids going against the grain because they see the world a little differently than everyone else. Then before you know it, these little pockets of cultural rebellion snowball into global phenomena that leave their fingerprint on a whole generation. And while they might seem like giant movements from the outside, if you look deeper you'll see that they were really driven by no more than a handful of key people. Exhibit A: LA graffiti The Los Angeles graffiti style, once found exclusively in Southern California, is now found on walls all over the world, on clothing, album covers, and packaging in on the shelves of malls everywhere, and corporate giants like Nike are doing collaborations with street legends like BIG SLEEPS. While there…
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